People

arrow

Alessandro Antonello

close
info:

Alessandro Antonello is a PhD candidate in the School of History in the Australian National University’s Research School of Social Sciences. His research investigates scientific, environmental and diplomatic aspects of Antarctic history after the Second World War, with a particular interest in the networks of scientists and diplomats who articulated and negotiated essential concepts in Antarctic history. He previously held curatorial positions in the Australian War Memorial’s Research Centre, and studied in the Museums and Collections program at the ANU.

arrow

James Beattie

close
info:

James Beattie is an environmental and garden historian who publishes on British imperial and Asian connections, as well as art history and the history of science. His book, Empire and Environmental Anxiety: Health, Science, Art and Conservation in South Asia and Australia, 1800-1920 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), presents a re-assessment of imperial environmental history, and examines exchanges of conservation and material among colonial South Asia and Australasia. He is also editor of 蘭園 Lan Yuan – The Garden of Enlightenment: Essays on the Intellectual, Cultural, and Architectural Background to the Dunedin Chinese Gardens (2008). With Greg Barton and Brett Bennett, he is founding editor of the journal, Oecology: International Review of Environmental History. He is presently Senior Lecturer, University of Waikato, New Zealand.

Projects:

arrow

Brett Bennett

close
info:

Brett Bennett is a Lecturer in history at the University of Western Sydney and a visiting resident in the Centre for Environmental History at the Australian National University. He has published widely on forestry history in Australia, India, South Africa, and Southeast Asia.

Project: The Changing Science and Ecology of Forests in Australia, India, and South Africa 1850-1950

arrow

Nicholas Brown

close
info:

Dr Nicholas Brown is a Senior Research Fellow at the National Museum’s Centre and for Historical Research, and at the Australian Dictionary of Biography at the Australian National University’s Research School of Social Sciences. His research interests span 20th century Australian environmental and social history, with a particular focus on biographical approaches.

arrow

Paul D’Arcy

close
info:

Paul is Senior Fellow, History, at the School of Culture, History and Language, College of the Asia Pacific, ANU. His research and teaching interests focus on the Asia Pacific region with particular emphasis on resource conflicts and their management and resolution; comparative, historical perspectives on sustainable development; and the maritime indigenous Pacific. His key publications are Peoples of the Pacific: the History of Oceania to 1870, Ashgate/Valorium, Aldershot, 2008, and The People of the Sea: Environment, Identity, and History in Oceania, University of Hawai’i Press, Honolulu, 2006. His three current research projects investigate the rise of Asian influence in the western Pacific; Asia Pacific environmental conflicts; and development options for small island states. Future planned projects include a history of sharks and humans in the Pacific, and a history of China and the sea.

View Paul’s profile at the School of Culture, History and Language, College of the Asia Pacific, ANU.

arrow

Ted Deveson

close
info:
My PhD research is an ecological history of locust and grasshopper infestations in southern Australia.It examines the interaction of environmental and scientific histories of the swarming species of Chortoicetes and Austroicetes in revealing their ecology and the influences that have shaped research over the 150 years these insects have been of agricultural concern.
arrow

Kirsty Douglas

close
info:

Kirsty Douglas is a heritage specialist with a background in geology and history. She has been an ARC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National University and completed her PhD in history at the same institution in 2004. She is the author of Pictures of Time Beneath: Science, Heritage and the Uses of the Deep Past (CSIRO Publishing, 2010).

arrow

Diane Erceg

close
info:

Diane Erceg is a PhD student at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University. She has also worked as a guide and lecturer on Antarctic tourist expeditions since 2005, and as a rapporteur at annual Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meetings since 2009.

Diane’s PhD research explores the environmental and culture history of Antarctic tourism including how Antarctica became a tourist destination, and the role of tourism in transforming the Antarctic environment and perceptions of it.

arrow

Kynan Gentry

close
info:

Kynan joined the School of History at the Australian National University as a Postdoctoral Fellow in May 2011. Prior to this he held a political research fellowship at Ruskin College, Oxford, and worked for a number of years as an historian and web historian for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage in New Zealand. He also has a number of years experience working in heritage consultancy, and as a special collections librarian and archivist.

Projects: Associations Make Identities, ‘Keeping places’.

arrow

Tom Griffiths

close
info:

Tom Griffiths is a Professor of History in the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University, Canberra, and Director of the Centre for Environmental History at ANU. His research, writing and teaching are in the fields of Australian social, cultural and environmental history, the comparative environmental history of settler societies, the writing of non-fiction, and the history of Antarctica. Tom’s books and essays have won prizes in history, science, literature, politics and journalism. His publications include Hunters and Collectors (1996), Forests of Ash: An Environmental History (2001) and Slicing the Silence: Voyaging to Antarctica (2007).

Read Tom’s full profile…

arrow

Christine Hansen

close
info:

Chrtistine Hansen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Environmental History. She was a curator at the National Museum of Australia between 2005-2010, and completed her PhD in History in 2009.

Project: Victorian Bushfire Research Project

arrow

Rebecca Jones

close
info:

Rebecca Jones is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of History. In early 2012 she commenced, ‘Slow Catastrophes: drought resilience amongst farmers and agricultural communities in Australia, 1880s-2000s’, an ARC Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) funded project, exploring the way people in Australia respond to and survive drought. Rebecca’s research interests include environmental history, agricultural sustainability and organic agriculture, public history and rural social and emotional health and wellbeing. She is interested in incorporating learnings from other academic disciplines into historical research and has, for many years, worked across research in both history and the social and cultural aspects of health. She completed her PhD in the Department of Rural and Indigenous Health at Monash University in 2009 exploring environmental history and health in Australian organic farming and gardening. She is the author of Green Harvest: a history of organic farming and gardening in Australia, published by CSIRO publishing in 2010. Prior to commencing her PhD she worked as a public historian working with organisations such as Museum Victoria, Land Conservation Council, Heritage Victoria, Victorian Department of Natural Resources and Environment (now Sustainability Victoria) and Local Governments.

arrow

Marie Kawaja

close
info:

Marie Kawaja is a Post-Doctoral Fellow on the ARC Discovery project investigating and analysing Australia’s Antarctic engagement. Marie is a former officer of the Departments of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) and the House of Representatives. At DFAT she was an Antarctic Desk officer at the time of the Australia-French environmental initiative that led to the 1991 Madrid Protocol. In the course of her assignment, she compiled for public research the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Meeting documents from the 1960s to the 1980s. She also prepared for release to the National Archives of Australia the old External Affairs files relating to the negotiations for the Antarctic Treaty. In 2010 she completed her PhD in the ANU School of History on the foundation of Australia’s Antarctic claim, in which she made pioneering use of National Archives of Australia files and argued the distinctiveness of Australia’s approach to Antarctica from its beginnings as a nation. She is presently expanding and preparing her thesis for publication with the working title: ‘The Politics and Diplomacy of the Australian Antarctic: from Imperial Offspring to Middle Power’. In addition she is participating in Antarctic symposiums and advising the National Archives on its 2012 exhibition: ‘Traversing Antarctica’. She is also writing the introduction to the Australian Antarctic Division’s centenary edition of the Australian Antarctic Magazine.

arrow

Darrell Lewis

close
info:

Darrell Lewis is a Research Fellow at the National Museum’s Centre for Historical Research. He completed his PhD at ANU in 2004 on the early history of the Victoria River district and is currently bringing it to publication as a book.

He has worked in the Northern Territory over the past 36 years, in jobs ranging from Bureau of Mineral Resources field assistant, to Northern Territory Museum field officer and consultant historian with the Australian National Trust (NT) and the Northern Land Council.

Darrell has written extensively on the Aboriginal rock art of Arnhem Land and the Victoria River district in the Northern Territory, along with the settler history of the Victoria River and Top End. His books include Beyond the Big Run, the biography of Northern Territory cattleman Charlie Schultz, and Slower than the Eye Can See, an environmental history of the Victoria River district. He has also published papers on the explorers AC Gregory, Burke and Wills, and Ludwig Leichhardt.

arrow

George Main

close
info:

George Main is a curator and an environmental historian at the National Museum of Australia. He is the author of Heartland: The Regeneration of Rural Place (2005) and Gunderbooka: a ‘stone country’ story (2000).

arrow

Joy McCann

close
info:

Joy McCann is an Australian social and environmental historian with research interests in landscape and memory in settler societies, the history of oceanography in the Southern Hemisphere, and scientific and cultural constructions of the deep ocean. She completed her PhD at the ANU in 2006 and is currently working on an environmental history of the Southern Ocean. She has extensive experience as a public historian in the heritage and museums sector, and is currently a senior researcher at the Parliamentary Library in Canberra.

arrow

Kathryn Medlock

close
info:

Kathryn Medlock is a PhD candidate in the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University. Her research is investigating the trade and exchange of thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) specimens by museum, the impact of these activities on extinction and how museums responded to the increasing rarity of the species.

She is the Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery in Hobart and has curated several major exhibitions as well as working directly with the collections. She is particularly interested in the historical aspects of collection development.


arrow

Cameron Muir

close
info:

Cameron Muir is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow (APDI) at the Fenner School of Environment & Society, Australian National University. He is the author of The Broken Promise of Agricultural Progress: An Environmental History (Routledge 2014). His research interests include histories of agriculture and food, science and place, and biology and biological thought. In 2010 he won the Griffith REVIEW Emerging Writers’ Prize for non-fiction. In 2013/14 he was a Fellow at the Rachel Carson Center in Munich. Read some of his essays at Griffith REVIEW: ‘Feeding the world’ and ‘Marrying health and agriculture’, and at Inside Story. He is currently serving on the Reference Panel for the One River Project, a Centenary of Canberra project that will engage with scientists, traditional owners, artists and communities to create local events, debate, films and a range of other activities across the Murray-Darling Basin and in Canberra throughout 2013.

Projects: After Agriculture and The Culture of Weeds

arrow

Chris O’Brien

close
info:

Dr Chris O’Brien is an Historian and Post-Doctoral Researcher with the Northern Research Futures Collaborative Research Network (CRN) based at the Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods (RIEL), Charles Darwin University (CDU), Darwin and affiliated with ANU’s Centre for Environmental History. On July 13 Chris was awarded a PhD in History from ANU for his thesis A Clockwork Climate: An Atmospheric History of Northern Australia. In addition to converting his thesis into a book, Chris is working on a history of weather and climate across the Indonesian Maritime Continent and the Arafuru/Timor region, post 1600 CE, tentatively called Chasing the Winds. Chris’ research interests include weather, climate, oceans, modern scientific and environmental knowledge, northern Australia, southern Asia and time.

arrow

Emily O’Gorman

close
info:

Emily O’Gorman is a Lecturer in the Department of Environment and Geography at Macquarie University. She is a environmental and cultural historian with interdisciplinary research interests, particularly within the environmental humanities. Her research explores how people live in and understand their environments, with a particular focus on rivers, weather and climate change. She is especially interested in the changing environmental practices and knowledges of town and urban dwellers, industry members (farmers, miners), managers and scientists (meteorologists, ecologists, engineers), as well as the institutions that connect them.

She completed her doctoral studies at the ANU in 2009 on the subject of changing understanding of floods in the Murray and Darling river systems from 1850 to the present. This research was the basis of her book, Flood Country: An Environmental History of the Murray-Darling Basin (CSIRO Publishing, 2012).

Her current research focus is developing an environmental history of wetlands in the Murray-Darling Basin.

arrow

Jan Oosthoek

close
info:

Jan Oosthoek is an environmental historian based in Brisbane. For many years he has lectured and researched at the Universities of Newcastle (UK) and Edinburgh. He has published on a wide range of topics including forest history, the history of industrial water pollution and history of the ozone problem. His latest book entitled Conquering the Highlands. A History of the afforestation of the Scottish Uplands was published by ANU E-Press (2013). At present Jan has shifted his research interests to the environmental history of South East Queensland. He has also served as vice president of the European Society for Environmental History (2005-2007) and is author of the leading environmental history website Environmental History Resources. Jan Oosthoek also produces a podcast entitled Exploring Environmental History.


arrow

Alison Pouliot

close
info:

Alison Pouliot is a PhD scholar at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University. Alison's work has bridges the disciplines of history, science, photography and environmental writing in documenting biodiversity and environmental change.

Following a decade in freshwater research science, she worked for the last 15 years as an environmental photographer. Alison has a broad interest in environmental history and her PhD research addresses the great disconnect between the diversity and ecological importance of fungi and the amount of attention to their conservation and management. The project explores both Australian and European perceptions of fungi in environmental history.

In 2013 she co-edited a special issue on fungi in the Philosophy Activism Nature journal.

arrow

Libby Robin

close
info:

Professor Libby Robin is an historian of science and environmental ideas. Libby is a Senior Research Fellow at the National Museum of Australia’s Centre for Historical Research, Professor at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University, and Guest Professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) Stockholm Sweden (2011-2014).

Projects: The Culture of Weeds, Desert Channels, Expertise for the Future, IHOPE Project, Australian Environmental Historiography.

arrow

Alexandra Roginski

close
info:
Alexandra Roginski is a PhD student in the School of History at the Australian National University, where she explores the history of phrenology in Australia as it related to society, culture, place and race.In earlier research, Alex focused on the provenancing and repatriation of Indigenous ancestral remains kept at Museum Victoria, work detailed in her forthcoming book, Searching for Jim Crow: Race, Law and Body-Snatching in Colonial New South Wales (Monash University Publishing 2015).Alex is a participant in the Integrative Graduate Humanities Education and Research Training (IGHERT) program for students in Indigenous studies, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. She is also a research associate with Monash University and Museum Victoria.
arrow

Mike Smith

close
info:

Mike Smith is a pioneering Australian desert archaeologist and a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Historical Research.

For more than 30 years Mike has worked extensively across the Australian desert attempting to piece together a picture of the human and environmental histories of this diverse and fascinating region. Australia is the driest inhabited continent – and our distinctive drylands make up the largest of the continent’s biomes. Mike’s current project – ‘the archaeology of Australia’s deserts and drylands’ – reviews and synthesizes the deep history of Australia’s deserts, charting the development of distinctive Aboriginal societies over 30 millennia. His book – to be published by Cambridge University Press next year – will take stock of thirty years of lively research in desert archaeology.

Mike’s profile at the Centre for Historical Research, NMA.

Projects: The Archaeology of Australia’s Deserts and Drylands, IHOPE Project.

arrow

Peter Stanley

close
info:

Peter Stanley heads the Centre for Historical Research at the National Museum of Australia, where he has worked since 2007. Peter has published over twenty books, mainly in the field of military social history. His next book (to be published in October 2011) will be Digger Smith and Australia’s Great War. A theme linking his books is the idea of people in extreme situations. He is contributing to the Victorian Bushfire project by writing a book Black Saturday at Steels Creek: Fire and an Australian Community.

Peter’s profile at the Centre for Historical Research, National Museum of Australia.

Project: Victorian Bushfire Research Project

arrow

Carolyn Strange

close
info:

Carolyn Strange is the co-author (with Alison Bashford) of Griffith Taylor: Visionary, Environmentalist, Explorer (2008). Other aspects of her work on Taylor include two curated exhibits – at the National Library of Australia and the Macleay Museum, University of Sydney – on his life as a controversial early exponent of sustainable development. In 2009 she was the chief convenor of a multi-disciplinary public symposium, Violent Ends: The Arts of Environmental Anxiety, held at the National Museum of Australia. Carolyn has a journal article on Antarctica forthcoming (2012) in the Journal of Social History, titled, “Reconsidering the ‘Tragic’ Scott Expedition: Cheerful Masculine Home-making in Antarctica, 1910-13″.

arrow

Martin Thomas

close
info:

Martin Thomas joined the ANU School of History as an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in 2010. He is the author of The Artificial Horizon: Imagining the Blue Mountains (2003) and The Many Worlds of R. H. Mathews: In Search of an Australian Anthropologist (2011). Current projects include a monograph and film on the American-Australian Scientific Expedition to Arnhem Land of 1948 and a more general analysis of expeditions as a cultural form. His most recent book is an edited volume Exploring the Legacy of the 1948 Arnhem Land Expedition (2011).

Martin’s profile at the the ANU School of History

Project: Expedition to Arnhem Land in 1948

arrow

Alan Williams

close
info:

Alan Williams is investigating the relationships between Aboriginal population dynamics and their response to climate change over the last 40,000 – 50,000 years. Of key importance to this study is the development of databases of radiocarbon and other absolute dating data to provide a platform to investigate the changing occupation signature of Aboriginal people across Australia (although current focus is in the Arid Interior, Pilbara, Kimberleys and Top End) and compare it visually and statistically with palaeo-climatic records. Alan’s paper ‘A new population curve for prehistoric Australia‘ published in Proceedings of the Royal Society, Biological Sciences (2013), received wide media attention. Read some of the coverage in: Science NOW, Nature news, ABC Science online, and Sydney Morning Herald.

arrow

Sharon Willoughby

close
info:

Sharon Willoughby is a PhD Scholar at the Fenner School of Environment & Society at the Australian National University. Sharon’s research in Environmental History investigates gardens as a cultural and environmental force changing and being changed by the Australian Landscape.

Sharon has worked as the Manager of Public Programs at the Royal Botanic Gardens Cranbourne since 2000 where most of her work has focused on the Interpretation, Arts and Education Development for the Australian Garden. Sharon has a keen interest in Botanic Gardens and their role in telling our community stories about plants, people and global change.

Projects: ‘Gardening Beyond our Boundary’ and ‘The Culture of Weeds